Midnight Confessions (Review)

I enjoy Stephen Colbert’s humor and satirical wit. I even like his show’s adaptation of the time-honored Johnny Carsonesque style of night time format. He has some running skits that are quite humorous. In one of them, he pokes friendly jabs at his personal Catholicism by going to confession with the audience standing in for a parish priest. It’s a cute way to elicit laughs and guffaws from the studio audience.

Lately, Colbert has been plugging his latest book Stephen Colbert’s Midnight Confessions. This made me wonder what kind of book it might be. I was sort of hoping it might be similar to his tome America Again: Re-becoming the Greatness We Never Weren’t, or his more famous book I Am America (And So Can You!). I picked up a copy of his Midnight Confessions and brought it home.

One of the best parts of the new book are the illustrations created by award-winning political cartoonist Sean Kelly. The drawings have just the right tone and impact without overpowering Colbert’s writing.

That said, the book let me down. It was over-hyped. I think some of the two-liners come off in the same way the gags from that uncle we have, who laughs at his own jokes. The original jokes were funny on teevee, but much less satisfying in print. They need Colbert’s facial expressions and gestures to be truly funny. There were maybe two examples that actually caused me to laugh out loud.

The other thing that was underwhelming is the shortness of the book. The text is large font to take up lots of room on each page. This, in my opinion, puts Colbert’s book in the throw-away category. Because the humor is mediocre, the pages flip by very quickly. If you’ve ever bought a small carton of Ben & Jerry’s ice cream, you know how fast a treat can disappear. In this case, I would have been better off with the ice cream, not the book. If you buy Stephen Colbert’s Midnight Confessions at the airport, you will probably finish it before your plane obtains permission to taxi to the runway.

This little book of two-liners is obviously a promotional volume that keeps Colbert’s name in lights. It’s also a perfect book to give to the Colbert fanatics in your life; they’ll love it.

Midnight Confessions is not a bad book, but it’s not a great book, either. You’re probably better off purchasing the title by Candice Proctor, Robyn Carr, Bonnie Edwards, or from another author. Colbert’s confessions are best when they’re fresh from the teevee show.

Meantime Stephen Colbert’s Midnight Confessions is a throwaway book of non-relate-able humor and retreaded television gags. It will probably prematurely find its way to the remaindered stacks and thrift store book shelves.

Oh, I have one midnight confession of my own. I did not buy a copy of Colbert’s book. I checked it out from the public library.

{ Stephen Colbert’s Midnight Confessions by Stephen Colbert; 208 pages, published September 2017 by Simon & Schuster; ISBN:
978-1-5011-6900-7 }

Ciao
The Blue Jay of Happiness quotes Stephen Colbert. “There’s a degree of narcissism involved in anything in show business. I mean, you can’t do it without a healthy ego. Why would you want anybody to listen to you?”

About swabby429

An eclectic guy who likes to observe the world around him and comment about those observations.
This entry was posted in Books, cultural highlights, Entertainment and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Midnight Confessions (Review)

  1. GP Cox says:

    Thanks for warning me. I think I liked him better when he was on the Comedy Channel. He could interview a boring political figure or author and make it both humorous and informative.

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