On Second Thought

A year ago, I was presented with the opportunity to purchase my house. I mulled over the pros and cons. At first, I thought it would be smart to turn down the offer and find a newer place to live. I decided to sit on that decision for a month before accepting or declining the offer–when emotions would play a lesser role in thinking. I’m glad I had the second thought to be less hasty.

This January, I accepted the offer. The legal paperwork and mortgage were finalized in February. I’m satisfied with how everything worked out. The repercussions could have been negative had I tried to move to a different home or apartment at the end of winter, and, as it turned out, during the pandemic. The complications of moving out would have been too stressful. The financial considerations would have caused a hardship during the economic downturn caused by the lockdown. In this case, a second thought steered me towards the correct decision.

There are many instances when it is wise to act upon a first impulse, then let the cards fall where they may. When adversaries try to outwit us in a conflict, first thoughts and action in the emergency enable breathing room. However, when major decisions must take place, we are wise to consider our options and work out possible scenarios.

Our first reactions are often based upon emotional impulse. It’s good to allow the emotions to simmer down and carefully consider the quandary from different perspectives without dithering in the process.

“I write everything many times over. All my thoughts are second thoughts.”–Aldous Huxley

When faced with someone (or oneself) who hopes we will act on first impulse, pausing to consider possible outcomes lends purpose to our actions. Our mindfulness, helps us to avoid mundane ambushes in life. A second or a third thought helps to keep us from enabling harm. To examine and analyze the situation according to circumstances is how to engage the thinking mind. We allow ourselves to overcome our personal ignorance about the bigger picture. With clear-headed, reasonable logic, we are better able to make informed decisions and follow through with action.

One of the best aspects of having second thoughts is the fact that thinking is taking place. When we have even a little bit of breathing room, strategic thinking usually wins over impulsiveness.

While trying to decide upon a topic for today’s blog post my second thought was to expand upon the idea of second thoughts, I’m glad this came to mind.

Ciao


The Blue Jay of Happiness quotes Vincent Van Gogh. “Occasionally, in times of worry, I’ve longed to be stylish, but on second thought, I say no-just let me be myself-and express rough, yet true things with rough workmanship.”

About swabby429

An eclectic guy who likes to observe the world around him and comment about those observations.
This entry was posted in Hometown, Meanderings, philosophy and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

5 Responses to On Second Thought

  1. Fascinating. Isn’t it interesting to see how other people think?

    My hubby and I are both on the emotional side, and you are correct about how that personality affects our decision making.

    On the other hand, people who are emotional tend to be spontaneous and fun and artistic. I value that stuff. It makes the world sparkle.

    Getting SUPER sick for the last eight years has been of inestimable value in curbing my impulsive streak. I’m just too tired to say or do stupid sh** –you know?
    I’m thankful.

    Thank you for your interesting post, friend. I’m glad you bought your 🏠. Good for you for being deliberate and thoughtful.

    I must learn from this.

  2. Jeff Flesch says:

    Reflection is key. Great post, Jay.

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